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boyexemplified:

nevvymaster:

Well, that certainly blew up quickly. You guys are jerks.

Have more Dril Pencils.

Original comics/art by Gavin Aung Than

Words by dril

i am crying

(via imthegoblin)

Source: nevvymaster
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Answer
  • Question: could you talk more about the male disney villains being queer coded with stereotypes? - sharkprivilege
  • Answer:

    blue-author:

    commanderbishoujo:

    gadaboutgreen:

    biyuti:

    fandomsandfeminism:

    fandomsandfeminism:

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    Pink hair bows. 

    Many male Disney villains are what we would call “camp.” Effeminate, vain, “wimpy” and portrayed as laughable and unlikable. Calling upon common negative stereotypes about gay men, these villains are characterized as villainous by embodying these tropes and traits. 

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    Think about it: Often Thin/un-muscled figure, heavily inked and shadowed eyes (giving the impression of eyeliner and eye shadow?), stereotypically “sassy” and/or manipulative, often ends up being cowardly once on the defensive, many have comedic male sidekicks (such as Wiggins, Smee, Iago, the…snake that isn’t Kaa) 

    Other examples:

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    since i was talking about one of the disney man villains who doesn’t fit this stereotype yesterday…

    Gaston.

    my bf was listening to that song about him yesterday

    and i mentioned that he is literally the most terrifying disney villain

    why?

    because his type of evil is banal and commonplace

    there are white men walking around who are exactly like him

    men who think that women are prizes they deserve

    men who will not listen or pay attention to a rejection

    men who will go out of their way, if rejected, to ruin a woman’s life

    ppl often seem to miss this when discussion beauty and the beast since the stockholm syndrom ‘romance’ is also a giant icky thing

    the terrifying thing about gaston is that he is supposed to be (as all disney villains) a hyperbolic cartoon

    but he is the absolutely truest and most real villain

    because he exists in the real world

    we all know men like him

    Also, if we’re talking about queer coded characters the MOST important of all the characters is Ursula who was bad off of a drag Queen (Divine) and has a whole host of negative stereotypes.

    She’s also my favorite.

    This post is sorely missing some seriously important historical context. The term for this as film history goes is the sissy, and as a stock character the sissy is probably one of the oldest archetypes in Hollywood, going back to the silent film era. Some of the most enduring stereotypes of male queerness—the limp wrist, swishing, etc—can actually be traced to the exaggerated movements of cinematic sissies in silent films. And it’s important to note sissies were portrayed in a range of ways, though they were generally used to comedic effect; queerness was considered a joke, and the modern notion of the “sassy gay friend” in films can probably be traced back to this bullshit too. It wasn’t until the Hays Code was adopted in the ’30s that sissies almost uniformly started being portrayed as villains. Homosexuality was specifically targeted under the euphemism of “sexual perversion”, and the only way it could fly under the radar in films under the strict censorship of the code was by coding villains that way in contrast to the morally upright hetero heroes. Peter Lorre’s character in The Maltese Falcon is one off the top of my head, but there are a slew of them from the ’30s onward, and this trope didn’t go away after the Code ended either. More modern examples in live action films are Prince Edward in Braveheart, Buffalo Bill in Silence of the Lambs, and Xerxes in 300.

    So Disney just provides some of the most egregious modern examples of the sissy villain, but this is a really old and really gross trope that goes back years and years in Western film. There’s a fantastic book and accompanying documentary about the history of homosexuality in film by Vito Russo called The Celluloid Closet that gets into a lot of this.

    It’s incredibly refreshing to see a response to a post like this that starts with “This post is sorely missing some seriously important historical context.” and then goes on to provide important historical context that adds information to the point being made. I was seriously wincing and bracing myself for “You guys, you don’t understand. It was different back then.”

    (Of course, I wouldn’t have been worried if the name of the last poster hadn’t scrolled off the top of my screen by the time I got to it.)

Source: fandomsandfeminism
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princess-neville:

girls being kept out of the sciences and pushed into the humanities; the humanities being valued less in our society than the sciences; and the humanities and sciences being looked at as stark opposites that couldn’t possibly be enjoyed for the same reasons are all problems that need to in some degree be tackled together 

(via kithandkin)

Source: princess-neville
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marchcouldbedarker:

ragemovement:

Not just for those in Detroit, but anywhere where the right to water is being restricted or denied!

hey everyone, this post has only gotten a thousand or so notes and only a single follower of mine has reblogged this from me specifically.

Detroit has been shutting water off for entire neighborhoods regardless of whether people paid bills or not. Even if they didn’t, should that really mean that they should die of thirst? Should there really be a cost to stay alive?

Please, spread this. Link it on other sites so someone down the line who needs this anywhere can take back water, something that should be the right of every human being.

(via fivecentwisdom)

Source: ragemovement
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"The idea of the humourless feminist is an incredibly potent and effective silencer. It is used to isolate and alienate young girls; to ridicule and dismiss older women, to force women in the workplace to ‘join in the joke’ and, in the media, to castigate protest to the point of obliteration."

- Laura Bates, Everyday Sexism (via lovethyfemaleself)

(via kithandkin)

Source: lovethyfemaleself
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2damnfeisty:

rozhanitsa:

2damnfeisty:

Nobody gives the black girl mob credit for being smart as fuck. They clown but at the end of the day they are really intelligent.

And it’s not subtle at all.
Taystee is a math prodigy in addition to being well-read, Poussey is multilingual, Cindy just knows shit, Suzanne studies Shakespeare, Watson was a good student in addition to being a track star, Vee is basically an evil genius. Piper often learns the most from them; they taught her how to fight and helped translate Pennsatucky’s biblical threat.
The show flat out acknowledges the (academic) intelligence of the black inmates time and time again, but the audience collectively ignores it.

ALL OF THIS

(via bikinimuscles)

Source: ageofdesiderata
Quote

"Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts, and don’t put up with people that are reckless with yours."

- Mary Schmich (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via fivecentwisdom)

Source: onlinecounsellingcollege
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prokopetz:

Sometimes I wonder where those Canadian stereotypes come from. Then I remember that I put maple syrup on my bacon at breakfast yesterday.

I’m pretty sure this one is inevitable anywhere that pork products and maple syrup coexist. It’s like chocolate and peanut butter, but more likely to go rancid if left in a plastic wrapper at room temperature for days at a time.

Source: prokopetz